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Becoming Sinners Christianity and Moral Torment in a Papua New Guinea Society (Ethnographic Studies in Subjectivity, 4) by Joel Robbins

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Published by University of California Press .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Religious conflict,
  • Sociology, Social Studies,
  • Urapmin (Papua New Guinea),
  • Religious life and customs,
  • Human Geography,
  • Social Science,
  • Urapmin,
  • Sociology,
  • Sociology of Religion,
  • Oceania,
  • Social Science / Anthropology / General,
  • Christianity - General,
  • Anthropology - General,
  • Christianity,
  • Papua New Guinea

Book details:

The Physical Object
FormatPaperback
Number of Pages410
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL7711662M
ISBN 100520238001
ISBN 109780520238008

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Nov 28,  · Becoming Sinners: Christianity and Moral Torment in a Papua New Guinea Society (Ethnographic Studies in Subjectivity) First Edition. by Joel Robbins (Author) › Visit Amazon's Joel Robbins Page. Find all the books, read about the author, and more. See search results for this Cited by: Becoming Sinners: Christianity and Moral Torment in a Papua New Guinea Society (Ethnographic Studies in Subjectivity series) by Joel Robbins. In a world of swift and sweeping cultural transformations, few have seen changes as rapid and dramatic as those experienced by the Urapmin of Papua New Guinea in the last four decades. Becoming Sinners book. Read 4 reviews from the world's largest community for readers. In a world of swift and sweeping cultural transformations, few have /5. In a world of swift and sweeping cultural transformations, few have seen changes as rapid and dramatic as those experienced by the Urapmin of Papua New Guinea in the last four decades. A remote people never directly "missionized," the Urapmin began in the s to send young men to study with Baptist missionaries living among neighboring rolf-luettecke.coms: 1.

Jul 29,  · In Becoming Sinners he gives us an engaging ethnographic description of Christianity in a Melanesian society and challenges us to think about processes of cultural and religious change. This isan important book not only for anthropologists but also for historians of religion and for Christian theologians. Becoming Sinners Book Description: In a world of swift and sweeping cultural transformations, few have seen changes as rapid and dramatic as those experienced by the Urapmin of Papua New Guinea in the last four decades. Joel Robbins (born ) is an American Socio-Cultural anthropologist; he is at the University of Cambridge, where he is the Sigrid Rausing Professor of Social Anthropology and the Deputy Head of Division and REF Coordinator for Division of Social Anthropology, as well as a Fellow at Trinity rolf-luettecke.comity control: GND: , ISNI: . Apr 12,  · "Robbins's excellence as an ethnographer and theoretician is beautifully demonstrated in his book, Becoming Sinners, a ground-breaking ethnography of the interrelations between competing moral discourses in a context of rapid cultural change/5(53).

Jul 30,  · Buy Becoming Sinners: Christianity and Moral Torment in a Papua New Guinea Society (Ethnographic Studies in Subjectivity) by Joel Robbins (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible orders.5/5(1). Oct 22,  · This is the summary of Becoming Sinners: Christianity and Moral Torment in a Papua New Guinea Society (Ethnographic Studies in Subjectivity) by Joel Robbins. Category Entertainment. "Robbins's excellence as an ethnographer and theoretician is beautifully demonstrated in his book, Becoming Sinners, a ground-breaking ethnography of the interrelations between competing moral discourses in a context of rapid cultural change. Becoming Sinners: Christianity and Moral Torment in a Papua New Guinea Society. In a world of swift and sweeping cultural transformations, few have seen changes as rapid and dramatic as those experienced by the Urapmin of Papua New Guinea in the last four decades.